Emergency Preparedness Session Ideas for Union Staff

4 Replies

Emergency Preparedness Session Ideas for Union Staff

Posted by Joseph Lizza on Jun 26, 2018 10:53 am

We are pulling together our fall training schedule for our student staff. We always have a portion dedicated to emergency preparedness training and I wanted to see if anyone has some ideas of session ideas. We require all staff to have CPR and offer that during training, but want an additional topic of interest. We would want it to relate to something that they may encounter, past sessions have been on fire extinguisher training, active shooter, scenarios (medical, fire, fights) with skits, etc. Do any of your institutions offer or mandate bloodborne pathogens training for union staff? Thank you!
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Re: Emergency Preparedness Session Ideas for Union Staff

Posted by Trinity Gonzalez on Jun 26, 2018 12:16 pm

Hi Joseph, 
My institution does not require a bloodborne pathogen training for me student staff and student building managers. In fact, there is no "required" emergency training of any kind at the institutional level that I know of, and I've always included emergency management information in my student training because we did at my last institution plus it's SUPER important. Our custodial team goes through hazardous materials/chemical training that includes bloodborne pathogen information. That training is provided by our office of EH&S. For my team, we cover the basics of how to use the AED w/CPR, universal precautions, and our building-specific action plans. 

It seems like you have a pretty comprehensive list for your team. The only thing I'd encourage is to make sure they are aware of any evacuation plans and what roles they play in those plans. 

Hope this helps!
T

Re: Emergency Preparedness Session Ideas for Union Staff

Posted by Brian Koehler on Jul 5, 2018 4:02 pm

We have begun to include BBP as an expectation from staff training for our Operations staff (custodial, building managers and event staff)

Our EH&S department has paid for several safety-based modules to be included in the online training suite offered by HR - our full-time custodial staff is required to take the training annually per state regulations.  I figured it would be valuable for all of our operations staff including students to spend an hour learning some safety habits.

I know...one more training...

I groan when I have to do it too :)

"It looks good on a CV..."  - that's how I sell it

Re: Emergency Preparedness Session Ideas for Union Staff

Posted by Carol Hill on Jul 12, 2018 10:54 am

Joseph,

I have included several documents that may be helpful as you plan your training.  We also provide CPR training too, but each year we have our staff review their Building Monitor Guide on their own and then do some sort of quiz.  Sometimes we use the clickers or text response to questions so that everyone can see the percentage of responses for the answers.  This way we can talk more in-depth if needed.  We typically change the method up every other year, since we have a significant number of student staff return, and will do roundtable discussions or assign several topics to each small group and have the groups come up with a way to train the other staff.  This keeps them engaged and often sparks creative ways of training.

Carol
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Re: Emergency Preparedness Session Ideas for Union Staff

Posted by Michael Mironack on Jan 16, 2019 5:15 pm

We do not offer BBP training to our student staff - in fact we emphasize the opposite.  We're fortunate to have our own maintenance and housekeeping staff who get the training.  Our full-time building supervisory staff do as well.

Topics we review include:
Personal Safety
Awareness of potential hazards when responding to an emergency
Building evacuation procedures
Emergency equipment locations and use
Personal injuries - need to report for staff injuries as well as patron incidents
Harassment

Our training avoids specific step-by-step instruction as it is impossible to anticipate all variables for any given situation.  Instead, we use a "toolkit" approach of basic knowledge that could be applied to multiple situations as necessary.

Hope this helps.